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Thread: KGC10 Hakosuka Skyline

  1. #3781
    Opens Babalouie's Avatar
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    Cheers fellas
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  2. #3782
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    Quote Originally Posted by Babalouie View Post
    Heaps of US Zed guys seem to just bung on the Toyota calipers onto stock discs as a simple upgrade, so it seems to be a common thing.
    That's because there are two different types of calipers. Take a look at that photo again. The caliper on the left is a non-vented disc caliper-it will work with the stock disk. The caliper on the right is for a 20mm vented disk. It will NOT work with a solid disk. The pistons will fall out at about half-pad, and your pedal stroke will be ridiculous.

    1979-1985 toyota 4x4 trucks have the S12+8 for 13mm solid disk, 2 38mm pistons and 2 42mm pistons.
    1986-1988 toyota 4x4 trucks have the S12+8 for 22mm vented disk, same piston sizes.
    1989-1995 toyota 4x4 trucks have S12W for 22mm vented disk, 4 pistons 42mm.
    1992 Toyota 4runner the S13W calipers come into play, 25mm vented disk, 4 pistons 43mm.

    The 7/8's (14/16") master is not always big enough for S12W/S13W calipers-the 15/16 is big enough in every case I've delt with. The 7/8" master seems to work ok with the slightly smaller S12+8 calipers, but the 15/16 280ZX master pretty well works for all of them.

    As far as redrilling rotors...why would you do that when there are rotors available that do not need drilling, do not need boring, and will bolt directly on the back of the hub, that are the correct size for a 14" wheel? 1984-1985 non-turbo 300ZX front rotors are the correct pitch circle, correct hub bore, and bolt to the back of the hub like stock-but you will need either an 8mm spacer or a 17mm spacer to get the rotor centered up in the toyota caliper. The 8mm or 17mm is dependant on if it's the early style front hub, or the late style front hub-I do not know what you have there.

    The 1985 to 1989 Maxima rotor seems to to be the correct offset, but wrong center bore, the center bore would have to be opened up. There is some conflicting information out there on this-I've never tried to use this one.

    This is a photo of the S12W caliper, the 300ZX rotor, and a 17mm spacer, on a 1972 early-strut 240Z. That's the caliper you have, and *probably* the hub you have.



    Now, you might ask why the different calipers re S12+8 Vented and S12W? The S12+8 requires less fluid to operate, and is slightly narrower on the outside faces-meaning that more 14" wheels fit without rubbing. I have run all the stock US market 240Z and 510 wheels over the S12+8, and they all fit. The S12W caliper, due to the fins on the outside face, sometimes will rub on some 14" wheels. A lot of folks grind the fins down, I don't recommend it. The caliper will fit inside the barrel of most 14" wheels, but the backspacing of the wheel may not allow the caliper to clear. It's dependant on the wheels you are running.
    Last edited by Xnke; 01-05-18 at 01:05 PM.

  3. #3783
    Opens Babalouie's Avatar
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    That's heaps of info, thanks for taking the time

    I guess we'll have to see how we go with the master cylinder. Hako MC is quite small at 3/4 (and uses the two opposing piston Sumitomo calipers that the 240K does) so 7/8 is the next step up. I think 7/8 is stock for 240K? If so, then 7/8 on the Hako should be like using a 1in MC on a 240K...I guess we'll have to see.

    The S12W fins seem to be ok with the 14in Watanabes, the spokes arch out and make a bit more room.

    The 300ZX disc is this guy? https://www.proservauto.com.au/p/Bra...NIS-RDA608-273

    ...and I need something like this to sort out the hat offset, depending on the thickness I need? https://zcardepot.com/front-brake-ro...rade-240z-280z
    Last edited by Babalouie; 02-05-18 at 12:41 AM.
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  4. #3784
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    The S12W fins usually fit under any kind of banana spoke or Wantanabe type wheel, so you should be good there.

    The 300ZX disk is the one, yes.

    Yes, that's the type of spacer. Since we don't positively know that you need an 8 or a 17 or a 13mm or whatever, best bet is to use some washers to space out the rotor on a test fitting, measure how thick of a spacer you will need, and have a local machine shop or PF parts maker to cut you a pair. I'd bet you need the 17mm style, but I can't say for sure. They are not difficult to make, the only critical dimensions are the pilot bore and step, and the thickness-the hole just need to be all four the same size and equally spaced.

    So the dimension of the spacer-we can make an educated guess by knowing that the 300ZX is a 35.5mm tall rotor, and the original rotor for a 1975-78 C110 240K uses a 48mm tall rotor. Can you measure the dimension from the back of your rotor to back of the hub? That will let you know how thick of a spacer you will need.

    Another thing that worries me is that the C110 front strut uses a 71mm hub bore, and the 240Z uses an 81mm hub. This makes it very easy to make a spacer-you can turn the whole thing in one go and it's very simple to get things concentric vs doing a double-stepped bore from the back, but I can't seem to find KGC10 front rotor dimensions. I would expect them to have the 81mm bore as well...I'll keep looking.

    OK, so it seems the C10 Hako front struts should accept the 300ZX rotors and the Toyota calipers in an identical fashion to the 240Z parts-no need to change up to the C110 stuff. The MK63 4-piston brakes that were offered on the PS30/PS31 were also offered on the KGC10, and they are basically a very early version of the S12+8 toyota caliper-almost identical, in fact. I'd check to see if the original C10 hubs would fit, before I tore down the C110 stuff.
    Last edited by Xnke; 02-05-18 at 09:12 AM.

  5. #3785
    Bannered takai's Avatar
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    Fwiw, browsing T3 looking at bling and found these. Pretty sure they are the right ones; https://technotoytuning.com/nissan/2...hub-conversion
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  6. #3786
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    No, those will convert a 240z hub to use 280Z brake rotors. The hat height is different, the caliper placement is different

    To convert to the 300ZX rotor, you need the same type of spacer, but the thickness is quite a bit different.

  7. #3787
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    Now that I've done a big spruce up on the front end, it seemed a shame to stop. So the rear end comes in for some love too.


    The chromed potmetal tail light bezels had gone a little dull with the deposits from the exhaust, and without removing them, you can't really hoe into it when polishing. But once they're off, you can really go to town with a polishing ball on a cordless drill.


    The red lenses are detachable too, and the one above the tailpipe was noticeably dull. But I find that Meguiars Plastic Cleaner and Plastic Polish gets the fine swirly scratches out, and gets it looking reflective again.


    Then we move onto the engine bay. I think I haven't detailed the carbs in years, and heaps of crud and yellowy fuel stains came off when I had a go with some brake cleaner and a brush.


    ...and then you notice that the drip tray looks a little dull below the shiny carbs, so that gets a polish too.


    I'd given the piping and rocker cover a polish from time to time, but you get much better results when you take it all off and attack it with the polishing ball/drill. Barrel Bros Lip Balm polish works really well.


    The next bit was something I'd been putting off for ages, which is to sort out the messy routing of the spark plug wires. The car had come with some plug wire brackets, but I think they aren't actually for L-series, as I had to resort to all sorts of weird lengths of plug wire to get it to work, and it looked messy. I'd been meaning to buy a replacement set of 240Z plug wire brackets and clips, but they seem to only be available in USA 240Z webstores. I always thought that I'd eventually order some other parts, and get the plug wire clips at the same time. Well, I never did So I decided to splash out on the unreasonable shipping charges to get the little plastic clips sent out.


    I did get one other part though: a reproduction brake booster sticker, but that's it


    Before we start on the plug wires, I decided to make a recent addition a little more fancy. Hayashi Racing (of Hayashi wheels fame) is now making some really nice pieces for old Nissan engines; which are mainly for historic racing in Japan, where things like Tomei rocker covers for Nissan A-series go for thousands. So I had to get their billet oil filler cap. It has provision to be lockwired, and since the Hako has a big appetite for oil, it isn't the most practical idea to lock the filler cap in place...but it does look nice Check out the other cool stuff at http://www.hayashiracing.com/part/ And in Australia, you can get Hayashi Racing gear at Barrel Bros: https://www.facebook.com/BarrelBros/


    I have an MSD6A CDI system and MSD8285 hi-output coil, so it was nice to discover that MSD also do universal plug wire kits that you make yourself into custom lengths.


    You get 8 plug wires and one coil wire; each one is overlong and is already fitted on the plug-side. So you have to cut them to length and fit the plug end for the distributor-end. This is the #5551 kit, with straight fittings at the plug end.


    The kit comes with different types of fittings for the distributor end...we'll need the ones on the left.


    It also comes with this super handy-dandy tool, which is used as a cutting guide for the plug leads, and can be used to crimp the fittings too.


    First you measure up the length you need, then use the cutting guide to partially-cut the wire. You place the blade at a certain spot and rotate the wire to make the cut...then twist off the excess.


    It cuts only just deep enough to expose the insulated wire core, and leave just the right amount of it sticking out.


    I don't know how well you can see this, but you fold the central wire around the outside of the plug lead, leaving a little loop so that it doesn't touch the white insulating material.


    Then stick it in the vice and crimp it down.


    It leaves a super strong crimp and oh...you're meant to slide on the rubber boot beforehand...


    And you now have a legit spark plug wire. Now to make 6 more...


    Once they're all done, test for fitment.


    And as a last step (thanks to L'Antagonista on Instagram for suggesting it), rub the white lettering off the plug wires with a rag soaked in acetone, which looks a lot more period-appropriate.


    The new 240Z wire brackets and clips get the plug leads routed really nice, in comparison to what I had before...


    Looks much neater than before, and I really should have done this years ago.


    yes, you can get off the shelf plug wire kits for 240Z, but what fun would that be? The MSD kit was really satisfying and easy to use and gets a great result.
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  8. #3788
    Registered User bigshipengine.jpg's Avatar
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    Next level attention to detail is impressive!


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  9. #3789
    Jak Sie Masz! trent from punchy's Avatar
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    Much better
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  10. #3790
    Non Compos Mentos Gammaboy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Babalouie View Post

    Before we start on the plug wires, I decided to make a recent addition a little more fancy. Hayashi Racing (of Hayashi wheels fame) is now making some really nice pieces for old Nissan engines; which are mainly for historic racing in Japan, where things like Tomei rocker covers for Nissan A-series go for thousands. So I had to get their billet oil filler cap. It has provision to be lockwired, and since the Hako has a big appetite for oil, it isn't the most practical idea to lock the filler cap in place...but it does look nice Check out the other cool stuff at http://www.hayashiracing.com/part/ And in Australia, you can get Hayashi Racing gear at Barrel Bros: https://www.facebook.com/BarrelBros/
    Hint - lockwire to an R-clip, r clip to bracket or to cap - stops the cap undoing, lets you remove it for filling.
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  11. #3791
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    KGC10 Hakosuka Skyline

    The lockwire is also a (small) anti-theft measure for the filler cap at car shows, when the car might have its bonnet open for a long time when Iím not around.
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  12. #3792
    Unregistered User Permit Roadsailing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Babalouie View Post
    Before we start on the plug wires, I decided to make a recent addition a little more fancy. Hayashi Racing (of Hayashi wheels fame) is now making some really nice pieces for old Nissan engines; which are mainly for historic racing in Japan, where things like Tomei rocker covers for Nissan A-series go for thousands. So I had to get their billet oil filler cap. It has provision to be lockwired, and since the Hako has a big appetite for oil, it isn't the most practical idea to lock the filler cap in place...but it does look nice Check out the other cool stuff at http://www.hayashiracing.com/part/ And in Australia, you can get Hayashi Racing gear at Barrel Bros: https://www.facebook.com/BarrelBros/
    you need to go back to lockwire school again again Babs, if the 710 cap vibrates loose it will pull on the little capscrew in an anti-doupwise direction, causing it to become loose too.


  13. #3793
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    Looking good as usual Babs, still waiting for the tacho replacement post
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